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Tuesday, October 18, 2011

Paul Gilbert - Major Scale Fast Lick


When we talk about world of music, the octave is really divide in 12 steps, each one is called a semi-tone steps. On the keyboard or piano division is seen in the number of keys that exist within a single octave of 12 keys that consists of 7 white keys and 5 black keys.

On the guitar fingerboard, it is also seen that an octave is divided in 12 fret, one fret each step with a semi-tone or half tone, and step two frets is called a tone or a single tone.

All major scales have the distance of the semitones from 3rd to 4th (Mi to Fa) and from 7th to 8th (Si to 'Do'), so if you will play a major scale in one string then the first fret you press should have step two fret - fret two - one fret - two fret - two frets - fret two - one fret or 1-1 - ½ - 1 - 1 - 1 - ½.



In the C Major scales, patterns of this step produces a collection of tones without the sharp and flat, which means it is also only the white keys on a piano that form the C Major scales. With the same pattern scales, G Major has one sharp, F Major scales have a flat, the picture that is easier on the many sharp and flat in a tone ladder described in the next post.



Download Paul Gilbert - Fast lick using the major scale mp3

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